Master 1 & 2

Biology and Health


Overview


This program is dedicated to the molecular and cellular aspects of biology. It maintains a strong link between on the one hand the reductive molecular and structural approaches and on the other hand the more integrated approaches of cell biology, organism development and new therapeutic strategies. The program is part of a multidisciplinary context where progress in Biology (observation, sequencing, synthesis of the genome, omic approaches), go through dialog between disciplines (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science, Mechanics, …) and take into account ethical questions concerning bio-technological applications. The program includes courses at the heart of biological concepts as well as courses at disciplinary interfaces. Internships in research laboratories strongly participate in the educational program.

Language of instruction: English
ECTS: 120
Oriented: Research
Duration: 2 years.
Courses Location:

Year 1: Ecole polytechnique

Year 2: Ecole polytechnique, Orsay, Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris


Educational objectives


This program can be completed by a PhD thesis. Students will acquire a wide and high-level education integrating molecular and cellular aspects of Biology relying on multidisciplinary approaches.


Program structure


Year 1 of the program strongly relies on the Biology program in year 3 of the engineer cycle at Ecole polytechnique. It includes courses that will be elected through discussion with the academic team depending on the prior background and planned objectives of the students. Proposed courses include, but are not limited to, genomics, immunology, neurobiology, biotechnologies for health and agriculture, epigenetics, molecular systems biology, biophotonics, computational biology, therapeutical chemistry, biomechanics, physics of biological objects, biological image processing, experimental training… Year 1 ends with a 4-6 month internship in a research laboratory.

Eligible Year 2 courses include several structural biology courses (X-ray crystallography, NMR, Cryo-EM), practical structure-function relationships studies, molecular structures of the cell, bioinformatics, proteomics, personal research project, practical synthetic biology,… Some of these courses will be performed in collaboration with Paris-Saclay University. Year 2 ends with a 6-month internship in a research laboratory.

Year 1- Periods 1 and 2:

  • English or French for foreigners (4 ECTS). This may be replaced by an elected course or personal project if level in both languages is sufficient (in agreement with the teaching team).
  • Elected course to be chosen in agreement with the teaching team (scientific or soft skills course or personal project) (4 ECTS).

Year 1- First period:
Four courses (4 ECTS each) to be chosen among:

  • Immunology and infectious diseases
  • Biotechnologies for health and agriculture
  • Biodiversity and ecosystems
  • Genomes: Diversity, Environment and Human Health
  • Physique des objets biologiques: du nanomètre au micron
  • Experimental training in genetic engineering or Experimental training in quantitative imaging

Year 1- Second period:
Four courses (4 ECTS each) to be chosen among :

  • Integrative neurosciences
  • Molecular systems biology
  • Epigenetics and non-coding RNAs
  • Biophotonics and applications
  • Computational biology
  • Human and environmental toxicology*
  • Data sciences in biological imaging*
  • Project in bioinformatics*
  • Medicinal inorganic chemistry*
  • Biomechanics in health and disease*

*Only one of these 5 courses can be chosen.

Year 1- Third period:
Research internship in a laboratory (20 ECTS, at least 16 weeks).

Year 2- First period:
Five courses (6 ECTS each) to be chosen among:

  • Structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids*
  • Structural bioinformatics*
  • Synthetic biology*
  • Molecular structures of the cell*
  • Grant application*
  • Biologie structurale intégrée
  • RMN biologique
  • Cristallographie
  • Protéomique
  • Enzymes et industrie
  • Chimie bio inspirée
  • Ingéniérie métabolique

*At least three courses must be chosen among the five preceding ones.

Year 2- Second period:
Research internship in a laboratory (30 ECTS).


Description of teaching units


YEAR 1

Immunology and infectious diseases. Lecturer: David Ribet; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures

The immune system is essential to defend the organism against pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or pluricellular parasites. The goal of this course is to understand how the human immune system fights against these pathogens. Strategies developed by specific pathogens to counteract the immune system will also be highlighted to illustrate the complexity of host-pathogens interactions. Finally, this course will discuss the therapeutic approaches and strategies, currently used or under development, that will help to solve the major public health issues raised by infectious diseases.

Biotechnology for Health and Agriculture. Lecturers: Alice Meunier and Loïc Lepiniec; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
How to repair tissue damaged by age or disease? In addition to chemotherapy, organ transplants and prostheses have attempted to respond to this challenge by replacing the damaged organ or tissue. When possible and tolerated by the body, these very heavy interventions require lifelong treatments. Advances in cellular and molecular biology have led to the emergence of new therapies, using evolutionarily selected biological processes to repair deficient tissues. This part of medicine, called « regenerative medicine », targets a definitive cure of the patient and is the subject of a very active research. A large part will be devoted to stem cell biology, a field in full expansion and whose influence and applications are growing.
With increasing world population and limited resources availability (e.g. arable land, fossil carbon, and water), food security remains a major challenge. This challenge is amplified by an increasing use of plant biomass for green chemistry and energy production. At the same time, climate change and the importance of preserving the environment and biodiversity cause additional constraints on production systems. In this context, it seems necessary to develop a « sustainable intensification » of agriculture. We will see how plant biology and biotechnology can contribute to tackle these challenges, and their potential risks or limitations.

Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Lecturer: Emmanuelle Porcher; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
Ecology, the science of interactions between organisms and their environment, is the most relevant discipline to analyze the relationships between Humans and Nature, i.e. to understand how human societies and the rest of the biosphere influence each other. This course focuses on the concept of Biodiversity – the diversity of living organisms and their interactions – and examines the functioning of ecological systems, from populations to ecosystems. The general aim of the course is to provide scientific tools to understand and solve ecological problems, such as the effects of global change on biodiversity, the impact of biofuel expansion on hydrological cycles, the consequences of species loss on human health, etc. Interdisciplinary approaches are crucial to understand the joint dynamics of biodiversity, human societies and the physical environment. Emphasis will be placed on the notion of ecosystem service (natural processes that sustain and fulfill human life): this concept lies at the interface between ecology, economics and social sciences and makes it possible to analyze how human societies depend on biodiversity and to discuss the sustainability of environmental systems.

Genomes: Diversity, Environment and Human Health. Lecturers: Olivier Tenaillon and Hannu Myllykallio; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
Over the past decade, by drastically reducing the cost of DNA sequencing and synthesis, engineering science has revolutionized biological research. During this period, we observed an explosion in the number of sequenced genomes and applications resulting from DNA sequencing and manipulation. The aim of this course is to give an overview of this « genomic revolution » and how it has radically changed biomedical research in recent years.The diversity of the organization of genomes, the structuring of microbial communities in their natural environment such as the earth or the human intestine and their consequences on the ecosystem and human health, the discovery of new genes and functions, Human genetics and the history of human populations, or the identification of genetic factors involved in human diseases and cancers will be presented. We will detail the different tools and models used to integrate this massive amount of information for the basic sciences as well as for applied purposes. Throughout the course, we will present concrete examples of applications ranging from the design of a new generation of biofuels to bio-remediation or medical diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

Physique des objets biologiques: du nanomètre au micron. Lecturer: Rémi Monasson; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures (in French). Knowledge in statistical physics is required.
Over the past decade, by drastically reducing the cost of DNA sequencing and synthesis, engineering science has revolutionized biological research. During this period, we observed an explosion in the number of sequenced genomes and applications resulting from DNA sequencing and manipulation. The aim of this course is to give an overview of this « genomic revolution » and how it has radically changed biomedical research in recent years.The diversity of the organization of genomes, the structuring of microbial communities in their natural environment such as the earth or the human intestine and their consequences on the ecosystem and human health, the discovery of new genes and functions, Human genetics and the history of human populations, or the identification of genetic factors involved in human diseases and cancers will be presented. We will detail the different tools and models used to integrate this massive amount of information for the basic sciences as well as for applied purposes. Throughout the course, we will present concrete examples of applications ranging from the design of a new generation of biofuels to bio-remediation or medical diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

Experimental training in genetic engineering. Lecturers: Roxane Lestini, Anna Polesskaya, Pierre-Damien-Coureux, Yves Mechulam; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lab course.
This experimental program confronts the future engineer with some of the strategies of exploitation and reprogramming of living properties.
Through the experimental resolution of a biological problem, students discover and / or deepen the strategies and techniques of genetic engineering. In addition, this lab course allows students to acquire new knowledge not only through the resolution of the problem, but also through exchanges with the teacher-researchers who supervise the experimental work.

Experimental training in quantitative imaging. Lecturer: Anatole Chessel; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lab course.
This experimental program confronts the future engineer with some of the strategies of exploitation and reprogramming of living properties.
Through the experimental resolution of a biological problem, students discover and / or deepen the strategies and techniques of genetic engineering. In addition, this lab course allows students to acquire new knowledge not only through the resolution of the problem, but also through exchanges with the teacher-researchers who supervise the experimental work.

Integrative Neurosciences. Lecturers: Valérie Ego-Stengel and Xavier Nicol; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
Over the past decade, by drastically reducing the cost of DNA sequencing and synthesis, engineering science has revolutionized biological research. During this period, we observed an explosion in the number of sequenced genomes and applications resulting from DNA sequencing and manipulation. The aim of this course is to give an overview of this « genomic revolution » and how it has radically changed biomedical research in recent years.The diversity of the organization of genomes, the structuring of microbial communities in their natural environment such as the earth or the human intestine and their consequences on the ecosystem and human health, the discovery of new genes and functions, Human genetics and the history of human populations, or the identification of genetic factors involved in human diseases and cancers will be presented. We will detail the different tools and models used to integrate this massive amount of information for the basic sciences as well as for applied purposes. Throughout the course, we will present concrete examples of applications ranging from the design of a new generation of biofuels to bio-remediation or medical diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

Molecular systems biology. Lecturer: Meriem El Karoui; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
Biology is being transformed by the recent invention of new technologies which make it possible to quantify precisely many cellular processes at multiple different scales. This also underpins our capacity to engineer biology to build synthetic biology constructs that can be used to manufacture new medicines or to create biosensors capable of detecting toxic compounds. The course will cover the molecular basis of gene regulation and gene networks and how these can be understood as “gene circuits” similarly, at least to some extent, to electrical circuits. Cells are dynamic systems, and we will build intuition about the types of responses expected from different gene circuits by understanding how they be predicted using simple mathematical models. Throughout the course, we will discuss experimental techniques that allow direct comparison between theoretical models and real biological systems. We will also discuss real life examples and applications of synthetic biology tools.

Epigenetics and non-coding RNA. Lecturer: Stephan Wagner; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
In complex organisms, the study of the processes that allow genetic information carried by DNA to be stored and decoded in time and space, in a context consisting for the most part of DNA that does not carry protein information (98% of the mammalian genome is non-coding), constitutes a new field of research with major issues in both basic science and applied research. While we thought we had already gone very deep into the decoding of genetic material, thanks to the advancement of DNA and RNA sequencing technologies, we are once again facing new scientific, technological and ethical challenges to approach new codes related to epigenetic characteristics and non-coding RNAs, which will allow us to better understand the functioning of living organisms as well as the deregulation of genome expression in pathologies. Indeed, these advances have made us realize that the simple decoding of the sequences of our genome would not be enough to understand (i) the differential behavior of the different tissues of the organisms, (ii) the cell adaptation to endogenous/exogenous stress, but also (iii) the pathologies associated with DNA damage (mutations). As such, epigenetics, a relatively recent scientific discipline that goes beyond genetics, consists of studying the way by which DNA is decoded in a stable and reversible way, considering not only the genomic sequences, but also additional codes consisting of chemical modifications of DNA and associated factors. Non-coding RNAs also play major roles in genome regulation, whether or not linked to epigenetics. Surprisingly, the « epigenetic » codes, which are not written in the sequence of the 4 bases present in the genomes, can be transmitted from one generation to another in certain living organisms and could pass an environmental footprint to the offspring. This course will address the following issues:

  • How is genetic information decoded in different ways, beyond the DNA sequence, to give different phenotypes in different cells or different organisms (e.g., twins) with the same genotype? Concept of cellular identity.
  • What is the contribution of non-coding RNAs to these processes?
  • What is the impact of the environment on gene expression in the short, medium and long term? Notion of cellular memory.
  • What is the implication of non-coding RNAs and epigenetic marks in pathologies as well as in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential?

Biophotonics and applications. Lecturers: Cédric Bouziques and Marie-Claire Schanne-Klein; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
The quantitative analysis of biological processes is essential for fundamental reasons or in the perspective of biomedical applications (diagnosis, drug design,…). The observation of their dynamics at the molecule, cell, tissue and organism scales may be crucial to decipher these processes, but is often difficult to address through conventional biology analytical methods. The ability to directly image living systems with light is thus a revolution for current quantitative biology, and optics is becoming a central tool for biology or biotechnologies. What are the methods allowing multi-scale biological systems optical imaging? What can we learn from these observations? The objective of this course is thus to introduce major biological imaging concepts and methods of biological imaging (single molecule imaging, FRET, super-resolution, non-linear microscopy, optogenetics,…), which are useful in fundamental biology and may become central for biomedical applications. The students following this course will discover and master fundamental and operative tools in Biophotonics, illustrated by modern questions in molecular biology, cell biology or neurosciences…

Computational Biology. Lecturers: Thomas Gaillard and Thomas Simonson; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures
Today, bioinformatics is developing rapidly and in several directions, ranging from molecule to cell: analysis and comparisons of genomes, modeling of biological molecules and their interactions, and modeling of cellular processes. The main aspects covered in this course will be:

  • Comparison and alignment of sequences
  • DNA sequencing and genome reconstruction
  • Statistical models of DNA sequences
  • RNA and protein structure predictions
  • Phylogeny
  • Cellular interaction and regulation networks
    The course will include algorithmic aspects, some practical exercises on computer, and systems of biological significance such as ribosome or SARS.

Human and environmental toxicology. Lecturer: Thomas Gaillard and Thomas Simonson; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures and personal project
For more than a century, man has continued to exploit his environment, notably for energy purposes, through the use of fossil fuels or radioelements. Man also modifies his environment by introducing new compounds that find various applications in industry (solvents, plastics, nanomaterials), agriculture (pesticides, fertilizers), or medicine (medicines). Some of these compounds can affect human health.They also act on all the organisms living in a given ecosystem, upset their physiology and the established dynamic equilibria, as evidenced by the accidental pollution associated with human activity (Seveso, sinking of oil boats, Chernobyl). It is therefore particularly important, through toxicological studies, to evaluate the safety or harmfulness of the various compounds placed on the market, in order to understand their effects on our health, but also on the our environment.The main objective of this course is to understand some fundamental mechanisms of toxicity induced by compounds of chemical and biological origin as well as physical agents at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organism scale. In particular, the focus will be on sources of contamination and pollution, exposure pathways, duration and intensity of exposure to different xenobiotics, toxic effects, biomarkers for tissue Cellular, preventive and therapeutic means as well as some regulatory aspects. Using scientific articles, students will be asked to develop a toxicological file on a given compound or group of compounds whose objectives are (i) to identify the mechanisms by which these compounds affect human health and Impact on the environment and (ii) propose different measures to detect and limit the toxic effect of these compounds.

Project in Bioinformatics. Lecturers: Thomas Gaillard and Jean-Marc Steyaert; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; personal project.
This module corresponds to an individual or joint research project carried out in association with a researcher. Students discover a biological problem through modeling or simulation work. They acquire new knowledge while putting into practice the concepts of courses.The Python programming language is used, in particular the Biopython library.Topics include the analysis, prediction and engineering of sequences and Structures of proteins and DNA/RNA. Every week, the work progress is evaluated with the professors.

Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry. Lecturer: Gilles Gasser; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures.
The first part of the course deals with the biomolecule (DNA, proteins) structure and the quantitative assessment of biomolecule/ligand interactions (parameters, measurements, biophysical techniques). A second part presents the development of biologically/therapeutically active metallic complexes. Several roles or activities of the metal center are presented: purely structural role (e.g., enzyme inhibition or protein-protein interactions), ligand exchange effects (DNA-platinum complexes, release of small molecules like CO, and so on), redox activity (ferrocifene, Pt(IV) complexes, catalytically active complexes), and so on.

Biomechanics in health and disease. Lecturer: Abdul Barakat; 4 ECTS; 36 hours; lectures and personal project.
Biomechanics is the application of mechanics to biological and/or biomedical systems. Over the last twenty years, mechanical stresses have been identified as a key player in the regulation of physiological functioning and in the development of several pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers, glaucoma and diabetes. Mechanical considerations are also essential for the design and development of devices and therapies that target these pathologies. The role of mechanics extends from the molecular scale to the whole-tisuue scale. This course will present fundamental aspects of macroscopic and microscopic biomechanics and will discuss the role of mechanics in physiology and pathology. The course consists of lectures and research projects conducted by students. The lectures will focus on the following topics: 1) tissue-scale mechanics with emphasis on fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, and mass transport; 2) mechanics at the cellular level with a focus on cell behavior patterns and cell mechanotransduction; 3) the role of mechanics in the development and progression of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and glaucoma; and 4) mechanical considerations in the design and development of medical devices and therapeutic approaches. Student-led projects will be research projects that will advance knowledge in a field related to the role of mechanics in physiology and pathology. These projects may be of a theoretical, numerical or experimental nature. Students will present their results at the end of the term. They will also have the opportunity to visit laboratories in the Paris region working in these fields.

YEAR 2

Contributions of biochemistry and cryo-EM to the study of translation mechanisms. Lecturers: Emmanuelle Schmitt, Pierre-Damien Coureux, Yves Mechulam, Thomas Gaillard; 6 ECTS; 70 hours; lab and lectures.

The program of the teaching unit is organized over two weeks at the Biochemistry laboratory of Ecole Polytechnique. During the first week, you will conduct a mini research project aimed at characterizing the active site of an essential enzyme protein and performing a thorough study of the function of several amino acids in catalysis. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the experimental approach used to carry out a research project, to discover new methods, to discuss the validity of the use of these methods, their advantages and their limits. This course therefore provides useful tools in all areas of the molecular study of biological processes. During the second week you will attend a series of seminars directly related to the experimental study of the first week. A half-day will be devoted to the use of computer tools for the study of the phylogeny of RNAs and proteins and for the engineering of protein: ligand interactions. Finally, three days will be devoted to electron microscopy applied to ribosomal complexes. You will be introduced to the preparation of samples for microscopy and electronic cryo-micoscopy, you will be able to observe the grids prepared on one of the two microscopes available at Ecole Polytechnique. Finally, you will also be introduced to the collection and processing of cryo-electron microscopy images to obtain the three-dimensional structure of your object of study. The advantages and limitations of this technique will be discussed throughout this training.

Structural bioinformatics. Lecturers: Thomas Gaillard and Thomas Simonson; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures and practicals.
Many aspects of the structure, dynamics, function, and engineering of biomolecules (proteins but also RNA and DNA) will be discussed. The bases of their stability will be recalled; the main properties of the solvent; the effects that govern refolding and molecular recognition. We will discuss basic modeling tools: sequence alignment, homology modeling, molecular dynamics, docking. In addition to the theoretical bases (course + TD), we will manipulate these tools through mini-projects or TPs, in a linux environment. The softwares used have a very general interest in structural biology; some have been co-developed by the teachers.

Synthetic biology. Lecturers: Thomas Gaillard, Hannu Myllykallio, Yves Mechulam; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures.
This course will present the main bioinformatics and molecular biology concepts used to build new biological systems of therapeutic or industrial interest. It will deal in particular with synthetic regulatory circuits, new biofuels, proteins containing non-canonical amino acids, …

Molecular structures of the cell. Lecturer: Anna Polesskaya; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures.
This course will present several examples of central cellular structures, including the cytoskeleton.

Grant application. Lecturer: Researcher depending on the project; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; personal project.
Students will prepare a scientific project in the form of an application for a research grant.

Biologie structural intégrée. Lecturers: Herman van Tilbeurgh and Philippe Minard; 6 ECTS; 42 hours; lectures (in French).
The teaching will be done in the form of seminars by external speakers, illustrating the use of structural biology techniques (crystallography, NMR, electron microscopy, bioinformatics) in the study of living systems at the molecular and cellular level. Emphasis will be placed on strategies that use a combination of genomic methods, cell and structural biology, and biophysics.

RMN biologique. Lecturer: Carine van Heijenoort; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures (in French).
NMR is a key approach for the acquisition of advanced knowledge of protein structures and dynamics, their in vivo functions, their reaction mechanisms and their control. The course includes:

  • Introduction to pulse NMR and sequence calculation.
  • Introduction to solid NMR.
  • Interpretation and exploitation of the main NMR parameters.
  • Stable isotope tagging strategies.
  • Attribution of the spectra.
  • Structural analysis.
  • Methods of 3D protein structure reconstruction by NMR.
  • Analysis of movements in solution (which methods for which characteristic time ranges).
  • Analysis of interactions.
  • Methods and strategies of NMR approach of a biological problem. Concrete examples of NMR application in integrative structural biology.
  • At the frontiers of the technique: high molecular weight proteins, in cell NMR, unfolded proteins

Cristallographie, diffusion des RX, cryo-ME. Lecturer: Nicolas Leulliot; 6 ECTS; 42 hours; lectures (in French).
This course will provide the following skills. Advanced knowledge on three major techniques of structural biology; manipulate mathematical and physical tools for a thorough understanding of structural biology; acquisition of advanced knowledge concerning the resolution of structures of biological macromolecules; know how to choose the experience adapted to a specific problem; know the advantages and disadvantages of each technique; have a critical look at the structures deposited in the databases.

Protéomique. Lecturer: Virgine Redeker; 6 ECTS; 42 hours; lectures (in French).
This course will deal with methods related to proteomics, with strong emphasis on mass-spectrometry. This includes protein separation methods: 1D and 2D electrophoresis, Membrane protein case, complementarity with SPR approaches, problems raised by post-translational modifications (classical modifications, glycosylations, phosphorylations, new modifications, …), degradation (proteases, proteolysis in vitro), enrichment of the proteins of interest.

  • Mass spectrometry: Principles of ionization modes (MALDI, ESI) and analyzers (TOF-TOF, Q-TOF, Ion trap, Orbitrap, FTICR) used for protein analysis. Comparison of their specificities and their utilities in integrated strategies.
  • Applications: Analysis of post-translational modifications, quantitative proteomics (isotopic labeling and other methods), non-covalent interactions, imaging, interpretation of spectra of proteins and peptides.

Enzymes et industrie. Lecturer: Pierre Briozzo; 6 ECTS; 39 hours; lectures and lab (in French)
The course deals with the use of biochemical and structural knowledge on enzymes for their reasoned modification. Industry needs and expectations for some important enzyme families will be discussed. Through a three-day experimental project (comparison of production yields of a soluble enzyme, immobilized on beads, or immobilized in a reactor), students will see the importance of implementing enzymes. The other half of the teaching unit will include courses and lectures on examples of industrial opportunities: modified enzymes adapted to industries; rational design of drugs; production of molecules for chemistry, biofuels.

Structures, mécanismes et fonctions des protéines. Lecturer: Laurent Salmon; 6 ECTS; 41 hours; lectures (in French)
The goal of the course is to give advanced knowledge concerning the structural, mechanistic and functional aspects of proteins and metalloproteins, the main modes of activation and labeling of proteins for their purification or their visualization in vitro / in vivo, the nature and the action of reactive oxygen species on cellular constituents, as well as the use of enzymes for organic synthesis of molecules of interest.

Chimie Bio-inspirée. Lecturer: Ally Aukauloo; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures (in French)
The course shows that biology is an inexhaustible source of inspiration for chemists. It teaches the functioning of the metalloenzymes involved in the major energy transduction processes as well as in chemical transformations and to extract the main principles of their structure and reactivity to realize robust and efficient synthetic systems. It also illustrates the use of metallopeptides to carry out new chemical transformations.

Ingéniérie métabolique. Lecturer: Ioanna Popescu; 6 ECTS; 40 hours; lectures (in French)
This course gives the basic theoretical and experimental techniques used in metabolic engineering. Students will know and model the metabolic networks. Topics will include the experimental practices of cloning, synthesis, assembly, transformation, and fermentation, as well as the analytical techniques in metabolomics.


Laboratories involved



Career prospects


Education in molecular and cellular biology can be applied to research and/or engineering in various types of companies (Biotechnologies, Pharmas, Agrifood, …) or in teaching-research Universities. The program can also serve as the scientific side of a double formation leading to the sectors of regulation in biotechnology, IP, funding and management of innovation, scientific communication …

Institutional partners: Some teaching units will be taught in collaboration with Paris-Saclay University. Internships can be performed in laboratories supported by national scientific institutions such as CNRS, INSERM, INRA, CEA, INRIA …


Admissions


Application guidelines for a master’s program at IP Paris

Academic prerequisites

  • Licence/Bachelor in Science (Biology – Physics – Chemistry- Mathematics – Informatics) with a strong interest for and at least basic knowledge in Biosciences.
  • Direct admission in year 2 is possible for students having successfully completed the first year of a similar master (60 ECTS must have been validated).

Language prerequisites

  • English. Possibilities for a program fully in English.

Application timeline

Deadlines for the Master application sessions are as follows:
– First session: February 28, 2020
– Second session: April 30, 2020
– Third Session (optional): June 30, 2020 (only if there are availabilities remaining after the 2 first sessions)
Applications not finalized for a session will automatically be carried over to the next session.

You shall receive an answer 2 months after the application deadline of the session.
You can check your application status by logging in your candidate space.


Tuition Fees


National Master: Official tuition fees of the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and innovation (2019-2020, EU students : 243 euros / Non-EU students: 3770 euros)


Contact


Yves Mechulam
Laboratoire de Biochimie- CNRS UMR7654- Biology department
Ecole polytechnique- Institut Polytechnique de Paris

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